CHRISTMASES PAST including 1808

A Christmas carol - Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870CAROLSUINGERS

Presuming this is from CHRISTMAS CAROL. No Guarantees from me.

 

Nonsense drolleries : The owl and the pussy-cat ; The duck and the kangaroo / by Edward Lear ; with original illustrations by William Foster 1889

lear duck and roo travel
The Lear image and story are not to do with Christmas but are enticing nevertheless. The image of the Duck and Roo travelling the World is akin to Santa travel.The illustrations of both stories OWL and PUSSYCAT and the DUCK and the KANAROO are finely executed.

 
IN THE SYDNEY GAZETTE 1808

THIS being CHRISTMAS DAY, as well as the Holy Sabbath, Divine Service will be performed at Sydnev in the forenoon, and in the afternoon at Parramatta.

Sunday 25 December 1808

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627653

________________________________

ADELAIDE REVIEW

By Roger Haden 
Yet changes to the fare and the format of Christmas have occurred since the very early years of colonial Australia. Indeed, when the French vied for power in the antipodes, a Bûche de Noël (chocolate log) would not have been out of place to honour ‘visitors’ at an Aussie governor’s Christmas table. Not surprisingly, during much of the 19th century eating outdoors at a picnic to celebrate Christmas was commonplace. The old photographs and engravings depict groups sensibly enjoying their Christmas spread al fresco; children play, others read or lounge on the grass beneath shady trees (of which the Moreton Bay fig and towering eucalypt seem primordially suited).

_________________________________

 

The Chronological History of the Christmas Tree
A Christmas carol - Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870TURKEY

Pucker up for a kiss under the Aussie Christmas Bush
Holly, ivy, pine trees and mistletoe. traditional symbols of Christmas perhaps, but it’s time to start celebrating under another red and green flower, the Australian native Christmas Bush.

 

CHRISTMAS 1909 NORTHERN TERRITORY

Northern Territory Times and Gazette, Friday 25 December 1908, page 2article4364082-3-001

Northern Territory Times and Gazette Friday 25 December 1908

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4364082

A defective Santa Claus ([1904])

CHRISTMAS 1908.

Northern Territory Times and Gazette Friday 25 December 1908

BEFORE the next issue of this paper sees the light the old year will have departed and the year 1909, with its still virgin and unwritten pages, will have been horn. What the past year has brought us we know ; what the new year may have in store for us is a secret which still lies hidden in the womb of the future.

 


 

Aspects of the Antebellum Christmas 

Brownie in Christmas land - Jack, Marian1922BONBONS

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Buckinghamshire Council has an image of an Australian Aeroplane Canned Christmas Pudding from their Museum.

This month’s object is a 1940s tinned Christmas pudding, made in Australia.

Hot Christmas weather in Australia required major adaptation of Christmas customs in chilly Britain.  Cookery columns in Australian magazines featured recipes for hot Christmas puddings alongside ice cream puddings or cold puddings made with gelatin.  Australians also invented the Christmas picnic.   The 1930s woman’s magazine ‘Home’ recommended tinned Christmas pudding as ‘convenient and ideal too for the picnic hamper’.

This Aeroplane tinned pudding was probably produced to be eaten at a picnic. The label states ‘If required to serve hot place in boiling water for 45 minutes’ and many people may have eaten it cold.  It was produced by Gartrell White, bread and cake manufacturers based in Newtown, New South Wales and, in the 1940s, one of the largest individual bakeries in the southern hemisphere.

__________________________________

 

Christmas making - Miller, J. R. (James Russell), 1840-1912shepherds

Ten provençal carols (c1918)

Saboly, Micoulau, 1614-1675

With music and lyrics.

__________________________________________

    Christmas Damper from Australia

    In the Australian bush in the 19th century people had to improvise. The Billy Can is a tin, with handles, usually used to carry water.

 

Christmas pictures - Dulac, Edmund, 1882-19531922children6

MRS. PETT’S CHRISTMAS TREE;

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4364098

Northern Territory Times and Gazette Friday 25 December 1908

A TASTEFULLY decorated Hall, a real tree just plucked from the bush, the presence of old Father Christmas in person (looking rather too spry and juvenile for the part withal, despite his white hair and beard and red robe spotted with snow flakes), and a most amazing congregation of excited and happy children (where do they all come from ) constituted the main features of one of the most successful Christmas gatherings yet inaugurated by that kindly and energetic lady, Mrs. Pett.

 

DREAMING OF
A MALTESE CHRISTMAS

Frank L Scicluna
Adelaide, AUSTRALIA

____________________________

 
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4356288

Northern Territory Times and Gazette Friday 24 January 1908

NT XMASNorthern Territory Times and Gazette, Friday 24 January 1908, page 2article4356288-3-001

 
NT 2 Northern Territory Times and Gazette, Friday 24 January 1908, page 2article4356288-3-002  

______________________________________

Take a look at this 50 year retrospect of Australian Christmas weather written in 1923.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1989415

and sub titled POPULAR MISCONCEPTIIONS

The whole article is in the NLA Newspapers.

The Argus :Saturday 29 December 1923

Here are some of the stats.

Cold conditions prevailed in 1908 the temperature being 63.5deg on Christmas
Day while only 63 7deg was recorded on
Boxing Day, and 68 deg on December 27 The weather was cloudy and showery throughout the holidays.

 

FIFTY YEARS’ RETROSPECT.

Popular Misconceptions.

It is a common belief that the seasons are changing, and that it is singular for such cool weather to prevail as was the case on Boxing Day. This is refuted by officials of the Weather Bureau, who pointed out yesterday that it is by no means an uncommon occurrence to have stormy conditions about Christmas time In fact, it is a period of the year when thunder storms usually develop. Records show that excessively high temperatures are exceptionally rare during the Christmas holidays Taking all the years into  consideration, for the three days December 25, 26, and 27 the average Temperature since 1872 has been 77-deg and the morning and night averages 55.7deg, the mean temperature being 66 deg for a period covering 50 years, from 1872 to 1922, there
were only seven days during the Christmas holidays on which the temperature reached more than 90deg The highest registrations were -1876 99 deg , 1888, 94.0, 1892, 92.5, 1899, 99.2 1900, 95.9, 1903, 92 0,

__________________________________

JOHN QUIGGIN: COMMENTARY ON AUSTRALIAN & WORLD EVENTS FROM A SOCIAL-DEMOCRATIC PERSPECTIVE

CHRISTMAS AS USUAL 

________________________________________

 
Dreams of a white Christmas by Anne O’Brien
http://www.unsw.edu.au/news/pad/uniken/uniken0312/page16.html
 

St. Nicholas : his legend 1917  McKnight, George Harley, 1871-1951
http://www.archive.org/details/stnicholashisleg00mckn

st nicholas

 
http://www.archive.org/stream/yuletideinmanyla00prin
YULETIDE IN MANY COUNTRIES
yuletide in naples
 
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About nellibell49

LYNNE SANDERS-BRAITHWAITE (BELL) . AN ESTUARINE ELDERWOMAN OF URUNGA IN THE BELLINGEN SHIRE OF NSW AUSTRALIA

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